Tag Archives: 6th Maine Infantry Regiment

Funkstown raid kills a Maine Yankee’s pipe

A wild raid on Robert E. Lee’s post-Gettysburg retreat lines earned a Calais officer a mention in dispatches — and almost got him shot. A 25-year-old Calais schoolmaster in 1861, Reuel W. Furlong stood 6-2½ and had gray eyes, black hair, and a florid complexion. He joined the 6th Maine Infantry Regiment as Co. D’s […]

Sumter’s 9/11 aftermath: “We fondly imaged ourselves soldiers”

When Confederates fired on Fort Sumter, “we were all young. The most of us had seen nothing of the world,” said 20-year-old Charles Amory Clark, whom no one in April 1861 would mistake for a warrior. Born in Sangerville on Jan. 26, 1841 and raised in that rural Piscataquis County town, Clark stood 5-7½ and […]

Whether Tabbutt, Tibbets, or Tibbetts, an Addison warrior he was

Even if the government could not spell his surname correctly, Hillman Look Tibbetts of Addison still did his job as the good soldier he was. A sailor standing 5-10 when he enlisted in Co. G, 6th Maine Infantry on May 2, 1861, Hillman hailed from Addison, a sea-faring town on the Washington County coast in […]

A hero emerges at Chancellorsville, part 2

As Maj. Gen. John Sedgwick extricated his trapped VI Corps overnight on May 4, 1863, orders went to the 6th Maine Infantry Regiment to defend the corps’ far right flank along the Rappahannock River, even if doing so meant capture or death. As the night passed, time ran out. Concealed in dark woods near Banks’ […]

A hero emerges at Chancellorsville, part 1

 Talk about bureaucratic delay: The federal government took 33 years to reward Charles Amory Clark for saving a Maine regiment at Chancellorsville. Born in rural Sangerville in Piscataquis County on January 26, 1841, Clark “was a student at Foxcroft Academy” when the Civil War began. “I was fairly well fitted for college, and would have […]

Last Soldier Ceremony honors a Civil War soldier on Veterans Day 2019

A Clifton lad who “fudged” his age so he could fight to save the Union received a singular honor — the Last Soldier Ceremony — from the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War on Veterans Day 2019. Beneath a glowering, snow-threatening gray sky, some 50 people gathered at Maplewood Cemetery on the Rebel […]

Virginia night battle broke a Machias mother’s heart

Sometime in latter November 1863, Capt. Wyer Bradbury opened a letter from home. The news was bad — real bad. A merchant ship’s skipper, Wyer lived in Machias with his wife, Eliza, and the Bradburys had raised at least two sons, James and Willie. Twenty when he enlisted in Co. C, 6th Maine Infantry Regiment […]

British and Maine troops shipped from Eastport 43 years apart

Historical memory runs deep in Eastport, Maine’s easternmost city. Enduring a four-year British occupation connected to the War of 1812, a “throng of spectators” gave “six hearty cheers” when British troops departed Eastport on Sunday, June 30, 1818. Exactly 200 years later, a few hundred Eastport residents and visitors applauded as the British left Maine’s […]

Frightened Union casualties watch as their captors approach at Savage Station — Part III

Feverish with typhoid fever, Corp. Harrison Huckins of Co. K, 6th Maine Infantry Regiment, heard the rumors circulating around him by late afternoon on Sunday, June 29, 1862. One patient among the 2,500 to 3,000 sick and wounded Union soldiers confined to hospital tents at the large Federal field-hospital complex at Savage Station, Va., Huckins […]

George McClellan abandons his sick and wounded at Savage Station — Part I

Like a bullet-crippled Custer trooper watching Indian warriors approach him at the Little Big Horn battlefield, what did Corp. Harrison Huckins think as he watched Confederate soldiers walk toward him at Savage Station in Virginia on Monday, June 30, 1862? The Custer trooper knew the Indians were coming to kill him; did a similar thought […]