Tag Archives: Quincy A. Gillmore

General Grinch ruins a Charleston Christmas

Maine soldiers stationed on Folly and Morris islands listened on Christmas 1863 as, to paraphrase a familiar Christmas song, “it came upon the midnight clear, that glorious old cannon blast of old …” Like Ebeneezer Scrooge, Brig. Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore had little use for Christmas, at least for Charleston, South Carolina, still defying his […]

Mainers meet the Swamp Angel, part 2

After arriving on Morris Island and before meeting the Swamp Angel, S.C., 2nd Lt. Charles H. Foster and 40 enlisted men from the 11th Maine Infantry Regiment trained on the 10-inch siege mortars manned by the 3rd Rhode Island Artillery at Battery Reynolds on Morris Island. The Mainers “coolly and unhesitatingly … went into action” […]

Mainers meet the Swamp Angel, part 1

While that weren’t no angel the 11th Maine boys aimed at Charleston, Brig. Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore certainly thought it was. Few individual artillery pieces drew acclaim during the Civil War. For the Confederacy, there was the 12-pounder bronze Napoleon that Maj. John Pelham and his gunners from the Virginia Horse Artillery maneuvered at Fredericksburg […]

The mud and muck of Pulaski, Part IV

As the 36 Union artillery pieces embedded in the Tybee Island muck fired on Confederate-held Fort Pulaski on Thursday, April 10, the 8th Maine Infantry soldiers hastily trained as artillerists soon proved they could shoot as well as professional gunners. Army engineer Capt. Quincy A. Gillmore had anticipated that the Union’s carefully sited 13-inch mortars […]

The mud and muck of Pulaski, Part III

The 8th Maine Infantry soldiers guarding the Union artillery batteries placed upriver from Fort Pulaski helped prevent Confederate reinforcements from reaching that post, but could not shell it into submission. To do that, Army engineer Capt. Quincy A. Gillmore needed artillery placed on Union-held Tybee Island at the mouth of the Savannah River. Working “in […]

The mud and muck of Pulaski, Part II

Seldom in the experience of Maine soldiers had such idiocy been demanded of them. On Feb. 14, 1862, Lt. Col. Ephraim Woodman and five companies of the 8th Maine Infantry Regiment reported to U.S. Army engineer Egbert Viele on Daufuskie Island, about 5 miles from Fort Pulaski on the Savannah River in Georgia. Viele was […]

The mud and muck of Pulaski, Part I

Just like the graffiti character “Kilroy,” Mainers were everywhere during the Civil War, despite the modern belief that the Pine Tree State boys showed up only at Gettysburg. First Manassas? Check (Hiram Berry, Charles Tilden, and a few thousand etceteras more). Shiloh? Check (Comanche fighter Stephen Decatur Carpenter and a Maine youngster captured in Confederate […]

“You will guard this river by standing in it”

  Perhaps frightened — and at least worried — three privates from Co. C, 8th Maine Infantry Regiment, sensed the enemy approaching late one cold winter’s night in Georgia. Surely their captain would not leave them out here to face an enemy impervious to bayonets and bullets, would he? For some reason, Capt. John E. […]